Atrus to Develop AED Registry for State of Maryland

From: Fire Engineering

Atrus, Inc., creators of the National AED Registry, announced that it has contracted with the Maryland Institute for Emergency Medical Services Systems (MIEMSS) to provide a customized version of its automated external defibrillator (AED) registry for the State of Maryland.

MIEMSS is the state agency that oversees the Maryland Public Access Automated External Defibrillator Program to coordinate an effective statewide public access defibrillation program. Each facility that desires to make automated external defibrillation available under the program must possess a valid certificate from MIEMSS. Atrus will provide MIEMSS with an automated on-line registration process that will streamline the current process and provide enhanced data review capabilities.  The expected completion date of the project is September 1, 2013.  

"Sudden cardiac arrest is a major public health concern," said Dr. Robert R. Bass, Executive Director of the Maryland Institute for Emergency Medical Services Systems (MIEMSS). "The use of Automated External Defibrillators (AEDs) in the community, and this statewide registry of their locations, will improve access and save lives."

In addition to meeting Maryland's registration requirements, the registry will generate regular email reminders for users to periodically check the device to ensure it is in working order.  Registered users will also receive reminders to replace electrode pads and batteries which are nearing expiration date.  The registry is free to users.  

In making the announcement, Atrus President and CEO, Elliot Fisch, said "The State of Maryland and MIEMSS have long been recognized as leaders in Public Access Defibrillation and we are proud to work with them.  Providing this free service to AED owners will go a long way to assure that the devices are maintained correctly and will be operationally ready when and if needed."  

Atrus' AED Link system can make registered AED information available to 911 dispatchers so they may guide a caller to the nearest AED in the event of a cardiac emergency. "Currently, publicly available AEDs are rarely used in an emergency because people can't see them and 911 dispatchers are unaware they are nearby," Mr. Fisch remarked. "We look forward to working with 911 agencies in Maryland to close this missing link in the chain of survival."


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